HARRIET TUBMAN STAMP

CONTEXT

.@RealDonaldTrump speaks out about putting Harriet Tubman on the $20 bill #TrumpTODAY https://t.co/tfeSHQ3ec7

— TODAY (@TODAYshow) April 21, 2016

Andrew Jackson had a great history and I think it's very rough when you take somebody off the bill. Andrew Jackson had a history of tremendous success for the country.... I would love to leave Andrew Jackson and see if we can maybe come up with another denomination. Maybe we do the $2 bill or we do another bill. I don't like seeing it. Yes, I think it's pure political correctness. Been on the bill for many, many years and really represented— somebody that was really very important to this country. - Donald Trump on the Today Show, April 21, 2016

 

On April 20, 2016, then-U.S. Treasury Secretary Jack Lew announced plans to add Tubman to the front of the twenty-dollar bill, moving President Andrew Jackson to the rear of the bill. Lew instructed the Bureau of Engraving and Printing to expedite the redesign process, and the new bill was expected to enter circulation sometime after 2020; however, Steven Mnuchin, the current U.S. Treasury Secretary, said that he will not commit to putting Tubman on the twenty-dollar bill, explaining "People have been on the bills for a long period of time. This is something we’ll consider; right now we have a lot more important issues to focus on." - Wikipedia: Harriet Tubman

 

You want me to put that face on the twenty-dollar bill? - Donald Trump to Omarosa Manigault Newman

 

MAKING THE STAMP

Instructions on making your own stamps

BUYING THE STAMP

We are selling the stamps here.

USING THE STAMP

Instructions on how to stamp your $20s

ORIGINAL IMAGE

carte-de-visite portrait of Harriet Tubman
The original image upon which this stamp is based is a carte-de-visite portrait of Harriet Tubman taken in Auburn, NY around 1868. It can be found at the National Museum of African American History & Culture.

More information about Harriet Tubman can be found here:

EXHIBITIONS & COLLECTIONS

PRESS

PRECEDENT

British Penny Defaced in Protest by a Suffragette
British one penny coin from 1903, defaced by Suffragettes. British Museum.

IS THIS LEGAL?

Though anti-counterfeiting laws prohibit the willful destruction of, and stamping of advertisements upon, paper money, pursuant to I.I.18 U.S.C. § 333 of the United States Code, stamped currency is fit for circulation so long as its denomination remains legible.

For more legal information, refer to this blog post.

MAILING LIST

SOCIAL MEDIA

CONTACT

info@tubmanstamp.com

SUPPORT

The Awesome Foundation

This project was a recipient of a generous grant from the Awesome Foundation.

LICENSE

Creative Commons - Attribution - Non-Commercial - Share Alike license